Accidental re vegging

Ed Note: Re-vegging extends the life of cannabis plants into another season of flowers. Cannabis is an annual flowering plant, its life cycle limited to just one flowering season. Once that season ends, the plant will senesce and die, its seeds responsible for carrying genes through to another growing season.

A grower can manipulate a plant, forcing it to revert from the flowering state back to the vegetative state again. Cannabis displays a short-day photoperiod, meaning that it transitions from a vegetative period to a flowering period because it tracks darkness with internal monitoring.

When days become shorter and nights become longer—as in autumn—cannabis will naturally change into the flowering cycle and begin producing either female pistils or male stamens sex organs. Once flowering, cannabis will mature—the point at which you harvest—senesce, and then die. Re-vegging allows you to harvest buds from your plant and then grow the same plant again for a second harvest. Here are some other reasons why you may want to re-veg your cannabis plant:.

Proactive growers typically take clones of a plant prior to flipping it into a flowering state. Re-vegging is the only way to preserve an exact replica of a particular phenotype once it has transitioned into the flowering state. Growers sometimes keep mother plantswhich stay in the vegetative stage all the time, and pull clones directly from the mother, flipping those clones into the flowering phase when they are big enough.

But keeping mother plants takes time and space. Re-vegging allows you to get rid of mother plants, freeing up space in your grow for plants that only produce buds. A plant that has undergone a full growing season will have a complex and robust root system.

These plants can move through the vegetative phase quicker the second time around with their mature root systems, whereas clones and young plants will take longer to establish roots. Growers looking for a faster turnover during the growing season may find that re-vegging plants can eliminate the long waiting periods that clones and seedlings need to develop strong root systems.

If done correctly, monster-cropped clones have the potential to create plants with higher yields the second time around because of an increased vegetative mass, stronger stems and branches, and more node points for potential buds. There are a few ways that a cannabis plant can revert from a flowering period back to a vegetative period. Probably the easiest method, this will allow you to harvest a plant for buds and then re-veg it for a second growing season.

When harvesting, leave a few healthy flowers and branches in tact at the base of the plant. It will need more of a nitrogen-heavy diet for root and leaf development, as opposed to the high amounts of potassium and phosphorus that it likely received during flowering.

Early growth on a re-vegged plant may exhibit stress-induced mutations like single-fingered leafs and odd node patterning, but these issues should go away after a few weeks, once the plant regains its bearings.

Post-harvest re-veg plants often take a little bit of time to take off at first and some strains may not even be receptive to this method at all. But plants that are re-vegged successfully have been known to display increased vigor after the initial transition. Take a clone as you normally wouldbut be sure to remove all visible flowering nodes from each clone.

As with post-harvest re-vegging, monster-cropping may result in stunted and mutated growth at first, but with proper care and training, this method can produce massive plants with increased vigor and foliage growth. This can occur both indoors and outdoors, usually because of a light leak or a light-timer malfunction for indoor growers, or from planting outside too early in the season for outdoor growers.

Hi Raymond. Thanks for your comment! It appears that re-vegging plant does require more nutrients. Thanks for confirming this! I have some clones that were under24 hr lights. As soon as I put them under 18 hr light they began to flower.Cannabis is an annual flowering plant, its life cycle limited to just one flowering season. Once that season ends, the plant will senesce and die, its seeds responsible for carrying genes through to another growing season.

A grower can manipulate a plant, forcing it to revert from the flowering state back to the vegetative state again. Cannabis displays a short-day photoperiod, meaning that it transitions from a vegetative period to a flowering period because it tracks darkness with internal monitoring.

When days become shorter and nights become longer—as in autumn—cannabis will naturally change into the flowering cycle and begin producing either female pistils or male stamens sex organs. Once flowering, cannabis will mature—the point at which you harvest—senesce, and then die.

Re-vegging allows you to harvest buds from your plant and then grow the same plant again for a second harvest. Proactive growers typically take clones of a plant prior to flipping it into a flowering state.

accidental re vegging

Re-vegging is the only way to preserve an exact replica of a particular phenotype once it has transitioned into the flowering state. Growers sometimes keep mother plants, which stay in the vegetative stage all the time, and pull clones directly from the mother, flipping those clones into the flowering phase when they are big enough. But keeping mother plants takes time and space. Re-vegging allows you to get rid of mother plants, freeing up space in your grow for plants that only produce buds.

A plant that has undergone a full growing season will have a complex and robust root system. These plants can move through the vegetative phase quicker the second time around with their mature root systems, whereas clones and young plants will take longer to establish roots. Growers looking for a faster turnover during the growing season may find that re-vegging plants can eliminate the long waiting periods that clones and seedlings need to develop strong root systems.

If done correctly, monster-cropped clones have the potential to create plants with higher yields the second time around because of an increased vegetative mass, stronger stems and branches, and more node points for potential buds. There are a few ways that a cannabis plant can revert from a flowering period back to a vegetative period. Probably the easiest method, this will allow you to harvest a plant for buds and then re-veg it for a second growing season.

When harvesting, leave a few healthy flowers and branches in tact at the base of the plant. It will need more of a nitrogen-heavy diet for root and leaf development, as opposed to the high amounts of potassium and phosphorus that it likely received during flowering. Early growth on a re-vegged plant may exhibit stress-induced mutations like single-fingered leafs and odd node patterning, but these issues should go away after a few weeks, once the plant regains its bearings.

Post-harvest re-veg plants often take a little bit of time to take off at first and some strains may not even be receptive to this method at all. But plants that are re-vegged successfully have been known to display increased vigor after the initial transition. Take a clone as you normally would, but be sure to remove all visible flowering nodes from each clone. As with post-harvest re-vegging, monster-cropping may result in stunted and mutated growth at first, but with proper care and training, this method can produce massive plants with increased vigor and foliage growth.

This can occur both indoors and outdoors, usually because of a light leak or a light-timer malfunction for indoor growers, or from planting outside too early in the season for outdoor growers. Posted on November 28, by Patrick Bennett. Why Re-Veg a Cannabis Plant? Here are some other reasons why you may want to re-veg your cannabis plant: Preserve a Phenotype Proactive growers typically take clones of a plant prior to flipping it into a flowering state.

Eliminate the Mother Plant Growers sometimes keep mother plants, which stay in the vegetative stage all the time, and pull clones directly from the mother, flipping those clones into the flowering phase when they are big enough.

accidental re vegging

Reduce Vegetative Periods A plant that has undergone a full growing season will have a complex and robust root system. How to Re-Veg a Cannabis Plant There are a few ways that a cannabis plant can revert from a flowering period back to a vegetative period. Post-Harvest Re-Vegging Probably the easiest method, this will allow you to harvest a plant for buds and then re-veg it for a second growing season.By accessing this site, you accept the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy.

We use cookies to enable essential features of our site and to help personalize your experience. Learn more about our use of cookies in our Cookie Policy and Privacy Policy. You can unsubscribe from Leafly email messages anytime.

Once that season ends, the plant will senesce and die, its seeds responsible for carrying genes through to another growing season. A grower can manipulate a plant, forcing it to revert from the flowering state back to the vegetative state again. Cannabis displays a short-day photoperiod, meaning that it transitions from a vegetative period to a flowering period because it tracks darkness with internal monitoring. When days become shorter and nights become longer—as in autumn—cannabis will naturally change into the flowering cycle and begin producing either female pistils or male stamens sex organs.

Once flowering, cannabis will mature—the point at which you harvest—senesce, and then die. Re-vegging allows you to harvest buds from your plant and then grow the same plant again for a second harvest.

Help Needed: Should We Reveg or Late Clone

Proactive growers typically take clones of a plant prior to flipping it into a flowering state. Re-vegging is the only way to preserve an exact replica of a particular phenotype once it has transitioned into the flowering state. Growers sometimes keep mother plantswhich stay in the vegetative stage all the time, and pull clones directly from the mother, flipping those clones into the flowering phase when they are big enough.

But keeping mother plants takes time and space. Re-vegging allows you to get rid of mother plants, freeing up space in your grow for plants that only produce buds. A plant that has undergone a full growing season will have a complex and robust root system.

These plants can move through the vegetative phase quicker the second time around with their mature root systems, whereas clones and young plants will take longer to establish roots. Growers looking for a faster turnover during the growing season may find that re-vegging plants can eliminate the long waiting periods that clones and seedlings need to develop strong root systems.

If done correctly, monster-cropped clones have the potential to create plants with higher yields the second time around because of an increased vegetative mass, stronger stems and branches, and more node points for potential buds. There are a few ways that a cannabis plant can revert from a flowering period back to a vegetative period. Probably the easiest method, this will allow you to harvest a plant for buds and then re-veg it for a second growing season.

When harvesting, leave a few healthy flowers and branches in tact at the base of the plant. It will need more of a nitrogen-heavy diet for root and leaf development, as opposed to the high amounts of potassium and phosphorus that it likely received during flowering.

Early growth on a re-vegged plant may exhibit stress-induced mutations like single-fingered leafs and odd node patterning, but these issues should go away after a few weeks, once the plant regains its bearings. Post-harvest re-veg plants often take a little bit of time to take off at first and some strains may not even be receptive to this method at all. But plants that are re-vegged successfully have been known to display increased vigor after the initial transition.

Take a clone as you normally wouldbut be sure to remove all visible flowering nodes from each clone.Cannabis is an annual flowering plant, its life cycle limited to just one flowering season. Once that season ends, the plant will senesce and die, its seeds responsible for carrying genes through to another growing season.

A grower can manipulate a plant, forcing it to revert from the flowering state back to the vegetative state again. Cannabis displays a short-day photoperiod, meaning that it transitions from a vegetative period to a flowering period because it tracks darkness with internal monitoring.

When days become shorter and nights become longer—as in autumn—cannabis will naturally change into the flowering cycle and begin producing either female pistils or male stamens sex organs. Once flowering, cannabis will mature—the point at which you harvest—senesce, and then die. Re-vegging allows you to harvest buds from your plant and then grow the same plant again for a second harvest.

Proactive growers typically take clones of a plant prior to flipping it into a flowering state. Re-vegging is the only way to preserve an exact replica of a particular phenotype once it has transitioned into the flowering state. Growers sometimes keep mother plantswhich stay in the vegetative stage all the time, and pull clones directly from the mother, flipping those clones into the flowering phase when they are big enough.

But keeping mother plants takes time and space. Re-vegging allows you to get rid of mother plants, freeing up space in your grow for plants that only produce buds. A plant that has undergone a full growing season will have a complex and robust root system. These plants can move through the vegetative phase quicker the second time around with their mature root systems, whereas clones and young plants will take longer to establish roots.

Growers looking for a faster turnover during the growing season may find that re-vegging plants can eliminate the long waiting periods that clones and seedlings need to develop strong root systems. If done correctly, monster-cropped clones have the potential to create plants with higher yields the second time around because of an increased vegetative mass, stronger stems and branches, and more node points for potential buds.

There are a few ways that a cannabis plant can revert from a flowering period back to a vegetative period. Probably the easiest method, this will allow you to harvest a plant for buds and then re-veg it for a second growing season. When harvesting, leave a few healthy flowers and branches in tact at the base of the plant.

Re-vegging accidentally

It will need more of a nitrogen-heavy diet for root and leaf development, as opposed to the high amounts of potassium and phosphorus that it likely received during flowering. Early growth on a re-vegged plant may exhibit stress-induced mutations like single-fingered leafs and odd node patterning, but these issues should go away after a few weeks, once the plant regains its bearings. Post-harvest re-veg plants often take a little bit of time to take off at first and some strains may not even be receptive to this method at all.

But plants that are re-vegged successfully have been known to display increased vigor after the initial transition. Take a clone as you normally wouldbut be sure to remove all visible flowering nodes from each clone.

As with post-harvest re-vegging, monster-cropping may result in stunted and mutated growth at first, but with proper care and training, this method can produce massive plants with increased vigor and foliage growth. This can occur both indoors and outdoors, usually because of a light leak or a light-timer malfunction for indoor growers, or from planting outside too early in the season for outdoor growers.Cannabis is an annual flowering plant, its life cycle limited to just one flowering season.

Once that season ends, the plant will senesce and die, its seeds responsible for carrying genes through to another growing season. A grower can manipulate a plant, forcing it to revert from the flowering state back to the vegetative state again.

Cannabis displays a short-day photoperiod, meaning that it transitions from a vegetative period to a flowering period because it tracks darkness with internal monitoring. When days become shorter and nights become longer—as in autumn—cannabis will naturally change into the flowering cycle and begin producing either female pistils or male stamens sex organs.

Once flowering, cannabis will mature—the point at which you harvest—senesce, and then die. Re-vegging allows you to harvest buds from your plant and then grow the same plant again for a second harvest. Proactive growers typically take clones of a plant prior to flipping it into a flowering state. Re-vegging is the only way to preserve an exact replica of a particular phenotype once it has transitioned into the flowering state.

Growers sometimes keep mother plantswhich stay in the vegetative stage all the time, and pull clones directly from the mother, flipping those clones into the flowering phase when they are big enough. But keeping mother plants takes time and space. Re-vegging allows you to get rid of mother plants, freeing up space in your grow for plants that only produce buds. A plant that has undergone a full growing season will have a complex and robust root system.

These plants can move through the vegetative phase quicker the second time around with their mature root systems, whereas clones and young plants will take longer to establish roots. Growers looking for a faster turnover during the growing season may find that re-vegging plants can eliminate the long waiting periods that clones and seedlings need to develop strong root systems.

If done correctly, monster-cropped clones have the potential to create plants with higher yields the second time around because of an increased vegetative mass, stronger stems and branches, and more node points for potential buds.

There are a few ways that a cannabis plant can revert from a flowering period back to a vegetative period. Probably the easiest method, this will allow you to harvest a plant for buds and then re-veg it for a second growing season. When harvesting, leave a few healthy flowers and branches in tact at the base of the plant. It will need more of a nitrogen-heavy diet for root and leaf development, as opposed to the high amounts of potassium and phosphorus that it likely received during flowering.

Early growth on a re-vegged plant may exhibit stress-induced mutations like single-fingered leafs and odd node patterning, but these issues should go away after a few weeks, once the plant regains its bearings. Post-harvest re-veg plants often take a little bit of time to take off at first and some strains may not even be receptive to this method at all. But plants that are re-vegged successfully have been known to display increased vigor after the initial transition.

Take a clone as you normally wouldbut be sure to remove all visible flowering nodes from each clone. As with post-harvest re-vegging, monster-cropping may result in stunted and mutated growth at first, but with proper care and training, this method can produce massive plants with increased vigor and foliage growth. This can occur both indoors and outdoors, usually because of a light leak or a light-timer malfunction for indoor growers, or from planting outside too early in the season for outdoor growers.

Home Cannabis Hemp Industry Recipes. Oil Wax Vaporizer.By accessing this site, you accept the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. We use cookies to enable essential features of our site and to help personalize your experience. Learn more about our use of cookies in our Cookie Policy and Privacy Policy. You can unsubscribe from Leafly email messages anytime. Once that season ends, the plant will senesce and die, its seeds responsible for carrying genes through to another growing season.

A grower can manipulate a plant, forcing it to revert from the flowering state back to the vegetative state again. Cannabis displays a short-day photoperiod, meaning that it transitions from a vegetative period to a flowering period because it tracks darkness with internal monitoring. When days become shorter and nights become longer—as in autumn—cannabis will naturally change into the flowering cycle and begin producing either female pistils or male stamens sex organs.

Once flowering, cannabis will mature—the point at which you harvest—senesce, and then die. Re-vegging allows you to harvest buds from your plant and then grow the same plant again for a second harvest.

Proactive growers typically take clones of a plant prior to flipping it into a flowering state. Re-vegging is the only way to preserve an exact replica of a particular phenotype once it has transitioned into the flowering state. Growers sometimes keep mother plantswhich stay in the vegetative stage all the time, and pull clones directly from the mother, flipping those clones into the flowering phase when they are big enough.

But keeping mother plants takes time and space.

A Guide to Re-Vegging Cannabis Plants

Re-vegging allows you to get rid of mother plants, freeing up space in your grow for plants that only produce buds. A plant that has undergone a full growing season will have a complex and robust root system. These plants can move through the vegetative phase quicker the second time around with their mature root systems, whereas clones and young plants will take longer to establish roots. Growers looking for a faster turnover during the growing season may find that re-vegging plants can eliminate the long waiting periods that clones and seedlings need to develop strong root systems.

If done correctly, monster-cropped clones have the potential to create plants with higher yields the second time around because of an increased vegetative mass, stronger stems and branches, and more node points for potential buds. There are a few ways that a cannabis plant can revert from a flowering period back to a vegetative period. Probably the easiest method, this will allow you to harvest a plant for buds and then re-veg it for a second growing season.

When harvesting, leave a few healthy flowers and branches in tact at the base of the plant. It will need more of a nitrogen-heavy diet for root and leaf development, as opposed to the high amounts of potassium and phosphorus that it likely received during flowering. Early growth on a re-vegged plant may exhibit stress-induced mutations like single-fingered leafs and odd node patterning, but these issues should go away after a few weeks, once the plant regains its bearings. Post-harvest re-veg plants often take a little bit of time to take off at first and some strains may not even be receptive to this method at all.

But plants that are re-vegged successfully have been known to display increased vigor after the initial transition.

A Guide to Re-Vegging Cannabis Plants

Take a clone as you normally wouldbut be sure to remove all visible flowering nodes from each clone. As with post-harvest re-vegging, monster-cropping may result in stunted and mutated growth at first, but with proper care and training, this method can produce massive plants with increased vigor and foliage growth.

This can occur both indoors and outdoors, usually because of a light leak or a light-timer malfunction for indoor growers, or from planting outside too early in the season for outdoor growers. By submitting this form, you will be subscribed to news and promotional emails from Leafly and you agree to Leafly's Terms of Service and Privacy Policy.

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accidental re vegging

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Accidental revegging? Thread starter Saffron Start date Dec 4, Saffron Member.

accidental re vegging

Hi I am a new grower, and have been growing a few bag seeds the first three turned out great, my two clones from my favorite one soil botanicare and one drip hydro GH flora line. I thought there was great progress until I noticed unusual growth and instead of producing regular fan leaves it just puts out single leaf fan leaves. They have a much better life now but thats why I think thats whats going on If thats the case what would be the best path forward? Thank you for reading this far!

Should I kill the plants to free up valuable space or hack them up or just leave them be the more I think about it the only reason I could think that the two oldest clones would be shooting out single leaves everywhere when it had normal fan leafs before all the branches are dence and branched I don't have a clue how to find a solution I have searched hi and low If the pictures need to be better I could snap some more just the two older two clones have the single leaf issue.

Shanus Active Member. Carry on your prescribed light schedule, and give em days before doing anything rash.

These plants act like weeds sometime. Crazy weeds! Watch for balls, and pretend it never happened. Or, if you just gotta get room for a special batch, quit wasting time and cut them bitches. Excellent thank you bolth for the help I will do that I thought perhaps they might be useless or something I have a waterfarm one plant is taking up and I have some clones that need to go somewhere but I guess it will just be soil Hopefully I will get a bumper crop from all the wasted time Thanks again for the replys!


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